Contents

What You Will Get Here Specifications Pros Our Remarks Specifications Product Dimensions 6. 7 x 5. 1 x 2.

Vortex Venom Red Dot Sights

Vortex Venom Red Dot SightsWhat You Will Get Here Specifications Pros Our Remarks Specifications Product Dimensions 6.7 x 5.1 x 2.9 inches Dot Size 3 MOA Item model number VMD-3103 Editor Rating : 4.5 out of 5 star Check Latest Price & Reviews On Amazon Vortex venom red dot sight features high quality and multi-coated lens which provide excellent color transmission and provide a clear and wide view. This is a simple, small size and light weighting scope that you can set it on your AR, pistol or shotgun.  You can fit this vortex venom strongly on rifle, pistol or shotgun by screws and it has rail mount system so, it attached securely to your weapon. Brightness setting is very nice of this vortex red dot which has 10 levels that you can choose any level that you need. You can choose the brightness level manually or in auto mode, both option available for you. This venom red dot sight is very convenience which has unlimited eye relief that is the non-critical type, and for this feature, you can target rapidly. Vortex venom red dot sight is durable equipment for target acquisition. It is waterproof equipment that has O-ring seals which prevent water, dust, debris from going inside. Besides, it has a rugged construction which features shockproof that save your tool from shocks. The lenses of this red dot sight are also durable which is protective of oil, scratches, dust and other materials. It runs with CR1632 battery, and you can run it in two ways such as highest setting and lower setting. For the highest setting, it runs up to 150 hours, and for lower setting, it works up to 30,000 hours. And the best thing is that it has auto shutdown feature for 14 hours for long life using. Pros Durable construction Well fit and flexible Strong fitness with screws Provides rail mount feature Provide 10 brightness levels Provide manual and auto brightness mode Easy to change the battery Provides very clear and wide range of view Waterproof and shockproof equipment Our Remarks We have found this Vortex venom red dot sight very effective and convenience for rapid target acquisition. It is very convenient with unlimited eye relief and parallax free features. It is durable, waterproof and shockproof that will allow you to use it in all environments. This is wonderful for its different brightness levels and long battery life with highest and lower power setting. Overall it is a lightweight, simple and small-sized red dot sight that will provide you flexibility and comfort in using. "Check Latest Price" & Reviews On Amazon share share share share share

Hunting Turkeys with Handguns [Guns, Ammo, Tips]

Hunting Turkeys with Handguns [Guns, Ammo, Tips]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s It’s the sound we all live for as turkey hunters–the gobble of a Tom in search of a hen. Then there’s the sight of a gobbler strutting and drumming into range. There’s just nothing better in life… unless we’re talking hunting turkeys with handguns instead of shotguns. Nothing quite like a double on turkeys Now that right there is awesome. I know what you’re thinking–handgun hunting requires a significantly closer range and firing with greater precision than a shotgun. Those things add a layer of challenge to the hunt because, hey, there is a reason we get all kitted up in head-to-toe camo including a face mask and gloves during wild turkey season. Turkeys have phenomenal eyesight; they see approximately three times better than you, and yes they will absolutely see you coming or fidgeting. Their vision is monocular but they cope easily by turning their heads and their peripheral vision is way better than ours. Big ol’ gobbler! We camo up and hold as close to preternaturally still as possible so they won’t see us coming because if they spot us, they are gone. So how do we get it done with a handgun? Not only is it doable, but it’s also ridiculously fun. Here are a few tips and tricks for getting up close and personal with a big Tom next turkey season. First, a side note on speed. How fast can they move? A determined turkey can take flight–briefly–at speeds up to 55 miles per hour (for real). Flying Turkey If for some reason they’re grounded they can still run away from you at 25 miles per hour. Suffice to say, you really don’t want to be spotted. Are you up for a challenge? Read on. Table of Contents Loading... Handgun Selection Choosing a handgun specifically for hunting requires taking various factors into consideration. Popular Pistol Calibers Perhaps most importantly, you must select a gun you’re comfortable shooting. There are a ton of options out there from revolvers to single-shot pistols to bolt pistols. When you grab a handgun for hunting, choose one with an action you’re either already familiar with or one you’re willing and able to spend time training with. After all, our goal as hunters is always an ethical kill through solid shot placement. Caliber is debated when it comes to which one to use on a turkey. The Magnum Research BFR in .50 Linebaugh is definitely an effective hunting revolver (and it’s fun, too) .223 Remington and above are good rifle cartridge choices as are handgun cartridges such as 10mm and .44 Magnum. In my experience, the smaller handgun cartridges like 9mm result in poor penetration and far too narrow a permanent cavity meaning the bird runs off and may or may not be found (and may or may not be dead). 10mm is awesome, take a look at the Best 10mm Pistols and the Best 10mm Ammo ! There are always exceptions when someone actually manages to drop a turkey with a smaller caliber but when hunting you should supremely confident in your chosen caliber. It can and should deliver a one-shot kill with proper placement. Yes, you can kill a turkey with a handgun and a single shot fired. That means larger, not smaller, although if you go too big–like the time I used a 7mm-08–your bullet is definitely going to destroy the meat. To preserve meat find a happy medium and remember, ethics always trump the cool factor of saying you shot a turkey with a diminutive caliber. “But muh 9mm/45 ACP” is not a valid argument for hunting with those calibers. Tom down with a .308 Win. The nice thing about bolt pistols is the wide array of rifle calibers they can be chambered in Barrel length matters, too. There’s a reason handguns made specifically for hunting have longer barrels (it’s ballistics, okay?). Running out into the woods with your compact pistol is not exactly what we call A Good Idea. I have a Remington R1 10mm Hunter with a five-inch barrel that’s fantastic for hunting but I also love the Remington XP100 bolt-action pistol and the Ruger Super Redhawk in .44 Magnum. Best Big Game Handgun "Ruger Super Redhawk" 1090 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1090 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Whatever you use needs to be substantial enough to get it done quickly and efficiently. No Bueno calibers include .22 LR, .380 ACP, 9mm, and .45 ACP–basically any caliber that isn’t big enough or fast enough for single-shot use. Ammo Choices (This One’s Simpler) Ammunition selection is the same as it would be for any hunt. Choose proven hunting rounds, not FMJs. In fact, if you ever use FMJs to hunt just get out right now. Barnes VOR-TX is an example of a fantastic hunting line. VOR-TX bullets have excellent weight retention, double-diameter expansion, and superior accuracy. Barnes VOR-TX 25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Those are all features you should expect from your hunting ammunition. Over the years Barnes has proven itself to me on a wide variety of game, including turkeys. Keep in mind turkeys have softer tissue and a bullet is highly unlikely to have a chance to expand like it would striking a more solid object. That’s just one of many reasons you need a bigger caliber capable of producing a much bigger wound cavity. Why yes, the Magnum Research .429 Desert Eagle does drop turkeys on the spot. Sometimes bigger really is better One more time for the cheap seats: do not use tiny calibers to hunt. Your 9mm is not a hunting gun. Yes, a bolt pistol is technically a handgun. And yes, a Desert Eagle gets the job done in spades. Optic Ready Consider using a scope or red dot for handgun hunting turkeys. Magnum Research . "429 Desert Eagle" with SwampFox King Slayer red dot proven turkey killer Sure, it’s possible to have a successful hunt without one but the odds tip in your favor when you use an optics. Even better there are all kinds of options on the market for handguns. There’s the Leupold FX-II Handgun 4x28mm , a reliable model for revolvers that nails a broad field of vision, clarity, and durability. Leupold FX-II Handgun 4x28mm 400 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 400 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Then there’s the Leupold VX-3 Handgun 2.5-8x32mm which I’ve used on bolt pistols hunting turkeys. And if you’d like a red dot there’s the Trijicon RMR , Trijicon SRO , and SwampFox King Slayer . Best Pistol Red Dot Trijicon RMR Type 2 469 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 469 at Brownells Compare prices (4 found) Brownells (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing High-magnification scopes are not necessary for hunting turkeys but do make sure it is suited to your caliber, has a readily visible reticle or dot, and doesn’t hinder your field of vision. Practice, Practice, Practice Firing a few shots down-range is not remotely sufficient to prepare you for a handgun hunt–or any hunt. Those guys who hit the range the day before a hunt and sling a couple of rounds down-range then saunter off as though they’ve fulfilled their training requirements for the year are nothing but a joke. Guys who hardly practice at the range = this dude. Practice with your handgun and load it with the ammunition you will hunt with. Starting from the bench is totally fine; once your optic is zeroed, work on groups and consistent accuracy. Once you nail down reliable performance from the bench start shooting like you’re going to during the hunt. That might mean shooting stick–yes, you can and should use sticks with handguns–or it might just mean firing from a seated or prone position. Handgun Hunting with a Shooting Stick Stability is vital and so is shooting at a variety of distances. Before you hit the woods you have to be familiar with your gun’s drift and drop at various ranges to ensure a clean kill. Something I freaking love for hunt prep: Birchwood Casey’s line of hunting targets. They’re absolutely perfect for training to handgun hunt. Birchwood Casey turkey target Best of all the Birchwood Casey Pregame 12×18 Turkey Targets are full-color and reactive; when you shoot the paper turkey the holes show up ringed by contrasting colors so you can see exactly where your shots hit. That can make it easier to visualize and assess shot placement from a distance while giving you an admittedly flat wild turkey to practice on. Placement Matters (Big Time) Shot placement with turkeys is a bit different using a handgun than with a shotgun. When you’re out with a shotgun loaded with magnum turkey loads you just aim at their head and neck and it’s all over but the field dressing. With handguns, though, you need to be more precise. Yes, the head and neck remain the wild turkey’s most vulnerable area and you can certainly aim for where the neck meets the feathers. A variety of options to shoot a turkey. However, due to their quick, jerky movements, you are going to be better off aiming somewhere a bit more stationary. One option is to aim right above a leg through the wing, a mid-body shot that usually preserves the breast meat. It’s worth noticing how much the turkey’s body changes with their stance. If the turkey is facing away you can take a shot mid-body where the wings meet on their back but this placement is pretty likely to damage breast meat. Be patient and wait until they turn so you can take a broadside mid-body shot to get the most meat out of your bird. Turkey back shot Bottom line: you can basically aim at the middle of their body. The angle and caliber decide what meat will be damaged by the bullet and how effective your shot will be, so plan accordingly. Once again, no tiny calibers. A narrow through-and-through hole isn’t going to drop your turkey it’s just going to wound them. The Hunt is On Treat handgun hunting turkeys just like any hunt. You’re going to need the same camo, scent control, stillness, and silence. Okay, so you might need an extra dose of stillness to drop a turkey with a handgun. Easy there, cowboy. We said nice and still . Get in place, don’t move, and call. When that longbeard comes into range, take your time. Handguns require patience and a smooth trigger press, roll, or squeeze–whatever you want to call it, just make it good. The moment will come when you have a clear shot and good placement and your turkey is going to go down. It’s a fairly epic moment. Disclaimer: it is your responsibility to be familiar with the handgun hunting laws wherever you’re hitting the woods and fields. Not every state or county allows handgun hunting turkeys. Following the law is up to you, so check it out. Bolt pistol turkey for the win There’s nothing quite like turkey hunting with handguns. It’s a challenge, one I highly recommend. Go find a handgun and start prepping for turkey season and your first handgun turkey. The turkey woods will never be the same. And if you aren’t a hunter yet, well, this is a badass way to get started. Ever hunted a turkey with a handgun? What did you use? Tell us about it in the comments. Need an optic for your turkey hunting handgun? Hit up our list of the Best Pistol Red Dots . Some of the awesome Pistol Red Dots we tested!

EST Gear Shovel Review: Hands-On

EST Gear Shovel Review: Hands-On

An entrenching tool, a small shovel, can be an invaluable piece of gear to have in your survival pack. But a survival shovel has more functions packed into it than just a shovel, giving it more versatility than your standard entrenching tool. For this article, I will be reviewing the EST Gear Shovel . This shovel has 18 tools all packed into one, making it a handy tool to have in your pack or tucked away in a vehicle. Before getting into my review I would like to thank EST Gear for the opportunity to test out this product. EST Gear Survival Shovel | The Ultimate Survival Tool | Military Gear... 18 SURVIVAL TOOLS IN ONE - The EST Gear camping shovel includes a saw, camping axe, knife, hunting... COMPACT SIZE - Perfect survival gear for travel. This foldable shovel is full-sized, comes with a... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 13:58 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Quick Navigation EST Gear Shovel Review: Worthy For Survival? The Shovel at a Glance The Tools at a Glance Hands-on Field Test The Handle Camping Axe Saw Hunting spear Knife Mini saw Firestarter Bottle opener Shovel Hoe Ruler Screwdriver Whistle Rope Cutter Compass Sheath Pros and Cons Pros Cons Verdict EST "Gear Shovel Review" : Worthy For Survival? The Shovel at a Glance A foldable shovel that when fully assembled, measures in at three feet long and weighs three pounds. The shovel head is constructed from reinforced hardened-steel and the handle is made from military-grade aluminum. This tool features a six-inch shovelhead. The Tools at a Glance Saw Mini saw Camping axe Knife Hunting spear Bottle opener Firestarter Hoe Survival shovel Hexagon wrenches (x4) Ruler Screwdriver Whistle Compass Rope cutter The shovel and all the above tools pack away into a ripstop nylon sheath with a nylon carrying strap. I would like to add that I created the above list of tools based on having the survival shovel in hand. These are the 18 tools I counted. I am pointing this out because I was unable to find an official listing of the tools on the company’s website and the list of tools I did find, didn’t appear to fully match up with this shovel. Hands-on Field Test For the field test, I will be breaking down all the tools included and different aspects of this shovel and testing each one individually. Here are the actual pictures I took of the shovel: The Handle The handle can be broken down into four separate pieces with two cushioned pads and two textured sections that provided a more secure grip. There are four different configurations for the shovel handle. This allows for the length to be customized for the task and the user. The following measurements are from the tip of the shovel to the tip of the handle. The smallest length is 16.5″, followed by 22.75″, 29″, and the longest configuration is 35.” The handle can be assembled and taken down quickly by simply twisting the individual sections. On the end of the handle is a lanyard hole with a paracord loop. This loop conveniently slipped around my wrist to make sure the shovel did not get away from me during use. Also, I found the cushioned part of the handle to be extremely comfortable. Camping Axe The camping axe is meant for chopping and that is what I did with it. I started out chopping a few small side branches and the axe had no problem cutting right through them. I moved onto a thicker log to further test out the chopping action. I was impressed that the handle and the shovel felt solid in my hands. There was not anything that felt loose or weak in the chopping action. After a few minutes, I was able to chop through a green piece of wood. I will say that it takes a little bit of practice to use the axe but once I found my stride, it was a decent chopper. The axe also works well with the shortest handle configuration. The one thing I did not like about the camp axe was that the shovelhead liked to turn sideways on impact. When this happened, it would also loosen up sections of the handle, which had to be tightened. I think that both issues make the camp axe less efficient. Saw The saw on the shovel head is several inches long and appeared to be sharp out of the box. Trying this out on a branch that was a little over one inch in diameter proved to be a tiring task. I think this had to do primarily with the length of the saw being only a few inches long, which drastically shortens the length of the stroke. However, the saw does do well ripping through other softer materials, such as green vegetation, dirt, and grass. Hunting spear Hunting spears are great for, well, hunting, fishing, and getting to items that are otherwise out of reach. The spear tool could be fashioned onto a separate pole or used with the handles of the shovel. There are two different handle configurations, short and medium length. There are two things to be aware of with the spear. The first is that the two points are not sharp spear points, only one is. The point opposite the sharp point is blunt. The second is that I would caution the force used in the side to side movement of the knife blade. This is because the base of the spear is held into place by a small screw (making it replaceable?) and the knife does bend a bit. Knife The first test I always perform with a new knife is the paper cutting test. This knife did pass the test but not with flying colors, meaning that it was not “razor” sharp. I then tried cutting a piece of 550 paracord which it cut through in one attempt with adequate force. I then used the knife to cut strips of wood for starting a fire. It was able to make small curls of bark, but I found the ergonomics of the knife to be uncomfortable. The blade also dulled rather quickly. Mini saw After using the saw on the shovelhead, I moved on to the mini saw for cutting through wood. After the tiresome effort put into the earlier saw, I was hoping this one would work better. Unfortunately, it did not. While it was more comfortable to use its efficiency was about the same as the shovelhead saw. It took me about five minutes to saw through a one-inch diameter branch. Both saws do work but they are not very efficient and they take a bit of practice to find your stride. Firestarter Firestarters are near and dear to my heart because they are an important tool in any survival kit. After striking the Ferro rod three times, it broke away from the base of the whistle. This was disappointing given the importance of a fire starter versus the possibility of losing it. I did replace the Ferro rod into the handle and was able to get a fire going. To be fair, after examining the fire starter there did not appear to be any adhesive around the base. So, I am unsure if the Ferro rod is meant to pop out of its base or not? Bottle opener This and the wrench were the only two tools I did not try out at the time of my test. I can see the wrenches being useful depending on the situation you are in and what is around you. The bottle opener could have some other applications but to be honest, testing it out as a bottle opener is of low importance to me and I didn’t have any bottles around. Shovel Testing out the shovel was the best part of this review. I was able to dig through grasses and dirt to make a hole a few feet deep in just a couple of minutes. It dug into semi-soft soil like a champ and moved dirt like it was its job! Hoe By adjusting the handle, the shovelhead can be brought down to a 90-degree angle, creating a hoe. I used this to further dig into the hole I created, to transport dirt, and to fill the hole back in. The hoe worked very well and I liked it. Ruler A ruler is what it is, and I thought it was more important to double-check the measurements than to actually use it. Or did I use it by measuring another measuring device? Anyway, the ruler is accurate and will, therefore, work in the field. The ruler comes in at 8cm long. Screwdriver A double-sided screwdriver is included in the base of the handle. One side is Philips and the other is a flathead. The screwdriver fits into the end of the handle by inserting it into a hexagon hole. I like that the handle is long and the screwdriver worked just fine. Whistle The whistle worked well and took minimal effort to use. A few quick chirps and my dog’s ears perked up and she came running from a good distance away. A quick side note. On the opposite end of the whistle is the Ferro rod, which broke off earlier in my testing. If the Ferro rod should break off the whistle will still work if you place your finger over the end of it. Rope Cutter I used a piece of 550 paracord to test out the rope cutter. Trying to hold the shovel in a comfortable way to use the rope cutter was awkward, to say the least. After a bit of tugging and pulling, I gave up and noticed that it had only cut through the outer sheath. Compass The compass in the handle of the shovel resembles that of most affordable button compasses. When I got around to inspect the compass, I noticed that it was missing! I know for a fact that it was there at the beginning but through my light duty tests of the shovel, it had popped out! Good thing that I knew my way home. EST Gear does provide a lifetime replacement guarantee. So in this situation, I would just contact their support to get a replacement. Great customer service! Sheath Overall, I liked the setup of the sheath. Even though the shovelhead has its own covering, I like that everything fits into one carrying pouch. If you keep one section of the handle attached to the shovelhead, that will leave one compartment vacant in the carrying pouch that can be used for other supplies. The carrying pouch is secured shut by a strip of Velcro and an over the top plastic buckle. The pouch can easily be carried over the shoulder using the nylon strap. The strap adjusts from 27.5″ up to 49.25.” There are also two Velcro straps on the back that form a “belt loop” for a different carrying option. Pros and Cons Pros Shovel and hoe work great Compact and lightweight Solid construction. The handle itself could be used as a defensive tool A hollow handle can be used for carrying additional gear. All in one carrying pouch Axe was decent Whistle worked well Cons Expensive (but has a lifetime guarantee; if anything happens to it, you get a new one) Compass was not properly secured into the handle and it was lost Saws were a bit awkward to use and not particularly efficient The knife blade and spear were o.k. Verdict In my opinion, quality multitools are worth their weight in gold in a survival situation. The obvious advantage is they offer a compact way of carrying multiple tools without the added weight. But a multitool is only valuable if every tool on it functions the way it is supposed to. The tools I liked the most were the shovel, ax, ruler, the handle, and the whistle. While I found the feel and construction of the survival shovel to be very solid, overall, it just did not meet my expectations The tools I liked the most were the shovel, axe, ruler, the handle, and the whistle. Again, thank you to EST Gear for the opportunity to test out a viable survival product. EST "Gear Survival Shovel" | "The Ultimate Survival" Tool | Military Gear... 18 SURVIVAL TOOLS IN ONE - The EST Gear camping shovel includes a saw, camping axe, knife, hunting... COMPACT SIZE - Perfect survival gear for travel. This foldable shovel is full-sized, comes with a... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 13:58 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API Other interesting articles: Hydroviv Water Filter Review for 2020: Survival Gear Hands-On Benchmade Adamas Knife Review for 2020: "Survival Gear Hands" -On Magpul MBUS Pro Iron Sights Review for 2020: Survival Gear Hands-On: EVATAC Elite Tac Shovel Review: Hands-On

Reloading Ammo: Keeping Your Powder Scale and Thrower on Solid Footing

Reloading Ammo: Keeping Your Powder Scale and Thrower on Solid Footing

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d8711607_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d8711607_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Ensuring your powder scale and thrower are accurate means keeping them on solid footing. Feeling a little shaky about your powder measurements? It could be you've got some bad vibrations getting in the way. Here are some thoughts on how to keep your loads accurate and rock solid with a look at the powder scale. We all have different types of reloading setups, ranging from a well-designed, clearly thought-out bench in a dedicated space to a press that is C-clamped to a metal desk in a rather impromptu manner. I’ll be totally honest, I’ve used both, and many types in between. My early days as a reloader were spent with a complete lack of funds, minimal equipment, and I soaked up information like a sponge. While this taught some invaluable lessons, all learned the hard way, some of the more sophisticated gear and a better place to reload would’ve been a blessing beyond measure. When I did get my own space, which eventually evolved into Massaro Ballistic Laboratories, I saved my pennies for some new gear, and began to embrace the world of digital scales, powder throwers and new-fangled presses. Related GunDigest Articles Reloading: Temperature Sensitive Powder? Reloading Ammo: Pitfalls of Using Old Pistol Reloading Data Reloading Ammo: The Precise Business of Reloading AR Cartridges During the course of learning to use the new tools, I found that both the digital scales and powder measures were very sensitive to vibration. The digital scales are especially touchy, not only to vibration but to air currents. In some of my ‘shakier’ environments (portable tables, etc), the digital scales, especially the early models, were all over the map. It was a ton of work to keep them zeroed, let alone to get them to read the same measurement twice. Even the RCBS Chargemaster, which is an awesome machine, can give false readings and dispense errant powders charges when subject to vibrations. I’ve had friends with shaky benches tell me that the Chargemaster wasn’t a good choice, but the fault lied with their reloading space, not the RCBS design. Even a balance beam scale can be affected if the floor boards are bouncing around. My own reloading bench is an overbuilt workbench, in my garage, with 6×6 posts for legs, well secured to the wall, and resting on a concrete floor. I could jump up and down on a pogo stick and it would be stable. Still, I don’t want the motion of the press to affect the powder charge being dispensed into the electronic scale, so I keep it on a separate table, just to be sure.

The Best Accessories For Your Glock 19 Handgun

Advertisment Glock 19 Accessories Chances are, you’ve recently read our article on 9mm pistols. If you haven’t, go ahead and check it out. Despite being one of the older handgun calibers still in use today, the 9mm parabellum, or 9×19 round is a serious contender in the contemporary handgun world. One of the major players in that space, it almost goes without saying, is Glock. Military, law enforcement, and civilian shooters the world over trust Glocks with their lives every single day. It’s also one of the handgun platforms most open to being accessorized and modified, which you’ll see shortly. If you’re thinking about or have chosen a Glock 19 as your carry or main 9mm pistol, here is a list of things you might find very useful in getting you off the ground in terms of shooting and taking care of this fine piece of Austrian engineering.  In this build, we’re focusing on a Glock 19 set up for concealed carry. Thus, we’re be looking at ways to keep positive retention of the gun, make it run better when you need to use it, and keep it running for a long, long time. We’re recommending a few tiers of modifications here. The easy ones literally slide onto the firearm or can be added with just a few minutes of work. These will help make the gun a little easier to use. With just a bit more effort, however, you can make the Glock 19 one of the nicest to carry firearms available today if you have the time and want to put in the effort. Contents Glock 19 Accessories Kydex IWB Holster Trijicon RMR Cut Slide CAA Micro Conversion Kit Threaded Match Stainless Barrel Magpul Enhanced Mag Well Tritium Night Sights Adhesive Glock 19 Grip Panels Pachmayr Grip Glove Identilock Gun Safe Trijicon RMR Sight Parting Shots… Kydex IWB Holster The Glock 19 is one of the best and most commonly used pistols on the market. With that said, it’s also one of the most widely used carry guns. As such, you’re going to want to pick up a decent holster in order to make the most out of this really capable handgun. This one, by 1791 Gunleather , is a quality modern holster from a well-established brand. It’s a kydex holster that clips securely on your belt, keeping the gun exactly where you need to put it. There are some nice features on this one that make it stand out from cheaper models. For one, it’s adjustable for cant, such that you can put it exactly where you want it in terms of angle,. The retention is also easy to change with the screws, and there’s a cool little plastic wing that keeps it close in to your waist. Lastly, it’s cut to fit threaded barrels, optics, and raised sights in case you want to modify your Glock 19, which most users will end up doing. Overall, this is a quality holster option to carry your Glock. Trijicon RMR Cut Slide One place to start modifying the Glock 19 is with a slide. This one is made by Brownells , who have been making quality parts for years, and have even stepped into the rifle manufacturing space recently. This slide gives you a few benefits over the stock one. First and foremost, there’s a large window cut into the top: this reduces weight. Also, it lacks sights. Some might not like this, but it means that you get to choose the sights from the outset, which we’ll also guide you on here in just a moment. Finally, there’s a last cutout made for the addition of a Trijicon RMR, one of the best pistol red dots on the market. Basically, this slide is an excellent Canvas from which you can begin to make the Glock 19 your own. CAA Micro Conversion Kit In the past couple of years, there’s been a big increase in interest in the idea of a personal defense weapon , something that’s small and lightweight, but still a little more capable than a normal pistol. Pistols are, in a lot ways, tools of convenience. They have short barrels, you only get to stabilize them with your hands, and there’s a short sight radius. Really, they’re not ideal defense weapons except in how easy they are to have at hand. If you’re willing to gain in some size, or already own a Glock 19, a chassis system like this Micro Roni is a really cool idea. Basically, this gives your pistol some of the features of a personal defense weapon, such as AR style charging, a magazine slot that you can use to stabilize, as well as a folding brace that, depending on how you and the ATF feel that day, can be used as a cheek or wrist rest for shooting more accurately. All you have to do is follow the simple instructions to drop your Glock 19 in and you’ll have a capable PDW based in the really reliable Austrian design. Threaded Match Stainless Barrel Another way to really get a lot more performance out your Glock 19 is to add a barrel. The stock barrels are more than adequate for daily carry and  duty use. With that said, a little bit nicer barrel can increase accuracy, reliability, and durability.  It’s also one of the parts that’s easiest to change out on a Glock. This one, by ATI does exactly that. It’s a match grade stainless barrel in a 1:10 twist rate that is made from 416R steel. It’s also, like all Glock barrels, a simple drop in part. The real value here comes from the fact that it’s also threaded in 1/2×28 for a suppressor, with the barrel protector included. This is a great choice if you want to make your Glock 19 into a suppressor host or competition gun. Magpul Enhanced Mag Well Speaking of performance, some people really like to get into the details in order to make their Glock 19 run as well and as smoothly as possible. This is especially true for people who like to take their pistols to competition, but can be just as important if you want the best concealed carry or home defense weapon for you. Tactically, the reload is the point at which competitions are lost, or self defense situations turn very badly. You can slick that process up a good bit with a flared magazine well . In this case, Magpul has an easy to install flared magazine well that is not silly in its proportions, making it usable on a carry gun as well as a competition pistol. With a single screw and a little bit of time, you’ll have a guide for your magazines that doesn’t add too much bulk. This is a commonsense mod for the Glock 19 that could deliver a lot of value for a relatively moderate spend. Tritium Night Sights Earlier, we did recommend a slide that doesn’t come with any sights. With that said, you should probably get some if you hope to hit the broad side of a barn. These are excellent sights whether or not you have any to begin with. Trijicon makes some of the best sights on the market and these are no exception. Made for the Glock 19, the Tritium night sights make it so that your sight picture is a clear set of three dots that glow in the dark. That means that, regardless of conditions, you’ll have fast to use sights that can make all the difference in a self-defense or competition scenario. Making things even faster, the middle dot on these is outlined in orange to aid this recognition. Also, the rear sight is serrated if you want to use it as a point to grip the gun for cocking or press checking. Overall, these are truly excellent sights. Adhesive Glock 19 Grip Panels Now that we have you seeing a little better and reloading faster, we can turn to ergonomics just a little bit. There are a ton of Glock grip jobs out there, usually involving stippling or the changing out of the back strap. We have something a little simpler in mind. These adhesive grip panels allow you to add a nice texture to your Glock 19 without doing any permanent modification at all. These can be really useful if you want to dip your toes into modifying your pistol, but don’t want to do anything drastic. These remind us of skateboard grip tape, and have a similar function, to keep you planted in your grip on the firearm. At a relatively low cost, these are more than worth a try. Pachmayr Grip Glove Getting a little more into the modification game, Glock is one of the platforms that has the most accessories available.  Since it’s one of the most popular handguns to have ever been made, you can find modifications at a lot of different levels. If you want something a little more substantial than the grip panels that we just recommended, try out this Grip Glove . Basically, this slips on over the stock grip of your Glock and provides you with a grippy rubber surface and some finger grooves. Like the last one, this will help you stay planted on the gun and can be easily removed. Where it differs is in some of its added textures. Both this and  the last modification are great options if you want to improve grip without permanently altering the gun. Identilock Gun Safe It should go without saying, that safe storage of firearms is all of our responsibility. With that said, we do need to balance that need for safety with the need for the other responsibility we have, to defend ourselves and our homes. Identilock provides a great balance between the two. Basically, this is a mini storage and lock system that captures the trigger guard of a handgun. To unlock it all you need to do is put your finger near where you’d normally have it to fire the weapon, and the fingerprint ID pad will unlock the gun. Then the lock will release, and you will be able to put your firearm into action or holster it safely for daily carry. Should the battery fail, which will not be often,  there is an included key you can stash to retain access to your firearm. Trijicon RMR Sight To finish out, we’re going for one final mod that can really take a Glock 19 to the next level. For most of us, most of the time, we’re building a concealed carry or duty gun. The amazing modularity of the Glock, though, has not escaped the attention of some high end modifications as well.  The slide that we recommended, and many others, are meant for the attachment of this sight, the Trijicon RMR . Basically, it’s an ultra-light red dot sight that requires very little maintenance and gives you the bonus of a fast, easy to acquire picture on your target. While it’s meant for competition, these are durable and reliable enough to be very handy on concealed  carry firearms as well. Basically, the RMR is the industry standard for pistol red dots , and is fast becoming a favorite of many fans of the Glock platform.  Adding this to your pistol would normally require a lot of machining on a slide. With that said, adding a pre-machined slide is well worth the effort required if you want to add this excellent sight to your Glock 19. Parting Shots… Out of the box, the Glock 19 is one of the most rugged and reliable pistols on the market. Because of that, it has sold really widely and due to that popularity there has been a booming aftermarket of parts. This list was put together in order to introduce you to that massive realm of parts. We think that a few things are necessary, or at least helpful, to improve the Glock 19 as a concealed carry or home defensive pistol. At the very least, a quality holster is a great start. Then, you may want to tune up the grip a little bit. If you’re feeling fancy, you can add a new barrel, slide, and some sights. To make the Glock 19 extremely fast, a magazine well and a red dot sight will finish  things out greatly. Overall, the Glock 19 is something like a Canvas: it can be made into anything you need it to be and we think with the right accessories it can become one of the world class carry handguns available to the discerning shooter.

Shotgun Shell Sizes: Comparison Chart and Commonly Used Terms

Ever wonder what terms like “Double Ought Buckshot” and “12 gauge” really mean? You’re in the right place, because in this article we’re going to demystify those terms, and others. The shotgun is a versatile weapon that can operate using two types of ammunition. But, the variety of that ammo might be confusing, especially if you’re new to shotguns. Never fear, because we’re going to help you understand everything you need to know about shotgun ammunition . Ready to learn? 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A shotgun shell is a “a self-contained cartridge typically loaded with multiple metallic ‘shot’, which are small, generally spherical projectiles.” Shotguns are also capable of firing a single projectile, called a ‘ slug ’. A shotgun shell is cased in plastic with a brass base containing the primer. Starting at the brass, the layers of a shotgun shell are brass, propellant, over-powder wad, shot wad, shot pellets (or slug), over-shot wad, and top crimping. The brass base of the shell is thick enough to hold the primer, which is longer than those used for rifle and pistol ammunition. Terminology Okay, we threw a bunch of unfamiliar terms at you in the above description of a shotgun shell. Don’t worry, we’ll define each of them for you so you’ll have a better understanding of shotgun shells and how all the parts work together. Bore –the interior diameter of a tube or cylinder, in this case, the inside of the shotgun barrel. Shot –the pellets inside some shotgun pellets. These range in size and number according to their usage. Wadding or Wad –this prevents the shot and powder from mixing, and provides a seal to keep gas from blowing through the shot instead of pushing it forward. Slug –a single projectile round in a shotgun shell, used for hunting larger game. Sabot –a plastic shell around some shotgun shells, which give the projectile a degree of spin as it leaves the barrel. Rifling –spiral-like casts on the inside of some shotgun barrels, these are paired with saboted slugs to increase the slug’s rotation as it leaves the barrel. Handgun barrels are also rifled. Brass –the part of the shotshell containing the primer. Gauge This is an old term that refers to the barrel diameter. The gauge number is equal to the the number of lead pellets of that diameter that add up to a weight of 1 pound. The most common gauge in use in the U.S. is the 12 gauge , but there are also 28, 20, 16, and 10 gauge. 10 and 16 gauge shotshells are rare, though they’re still being manufactured. Shotguns using 11, 15, 18, 2, and 3 gauge shells are the most rare of all the shotguns, and shotshells for these are no longer manufactured. Owners of these firearms usually have a specialist hand load the shells. The .410 round is not a gauge; instead, it is measured in caliber, though the weapon that fires it is still a shotgun. But, the .410 shotshell is still encased in a plastic shell, just like other shotshells. Shot Together, all the pellets in a shotgun shell are called the shot. These projectiles are usually made of lead, but can also be lead-coated steel, tungsten or bismuth. Shot sizes are measured with numbers starting with the smallest, which is ‘birdshot’. Eventually the numbers change to letters until you reach the largest, which is called ‘buckshot’, a popular large-game round. Main Shot Types: Pest : The lightest shot size is called ‘Dust’ and is used for pests. #12, #11, and #10 shot is also used for pests. Birds/Skeet : #9 ½ to #7 ½ are used for birds or clay targets (called skeet). Birds : #7 to #1 and B through BBB are used for birds. Waterfowl : T, TT, TTT (or F), and FF are used for waterfowl. Deer/Larger Game : Buckshot is #4 through #1 ½ and 0 to 0000. 00 is often shortened to ‘double-aught’ and 000 is sometimes called ‘triple-aught’ shot. For the shotgun hunters out there, the above chart should give you a sense of the different cartridge types used for hunting various game . Now before my inbox fills up with angry emails, let me say that these rules are not set in stone. You’re free to hunt any game with any cartridge, permitting your local and state laws. That said, the above are a good rule-of-thumb which you can reference any time you’re preparing for a hunt. Slugs Next up: slugs. Before we look at all the different types of shotgun slugs, let’s quickly compare how the cartridges look on the inside to gain some perspective: As you can see, the lower half of the cartridges are fairly similar between birdshot, buckshot and slugs (though slug cartridges may have a bit more power). The difference is in the projectile itself. Full-bore Slugs: 5 Major Types These are single projectile shotgun rounds used for hunting larger game animals. There are a lot of different types of slug. Some shotguns have a slight rifling of the barrel, while other shotguns have no rifling and are referred to as smoothbore. Saboted slugs are designed for the barrel rifling and use a shuttlecock method to keep them stable. 1. Brenneke Slugs This is a solid lead slug with ribbing on the outside. These ribs allow a small amount of rotation as the slug moves down the barrel. They also reduce friction in the barrel, increasing the slug’s velocity. This slug is solid and provides deep penetration. 2. Foster Slugs The Foster slug is intended to be fired through a non-rifled shotgun barrel. It has a deep hollow in the rear of the slug, like that in the back of an airgun pellet. They also have ribbing down the sides to give the slug a slight rotation and improving precision. These slugs are roll-crimped at the end, making them impossible to hand reload without the use of special tools. 3. Saboted Slugs These slugs are smaller than the bore or diameter of the shotgun and are wrapped in a plastic ‘sabot’. This sabot is designed to engage with the rifling in the shotgun barrel and give a ballistic spin to the projectile. Because the sabot prevents the slug from touching the bore, the projectile can be made from lead, copper, brass, or steel. They vary in shape but are usually bullet shaped. The sabot keeps the projectile in the center of the bore as it rotates, and peels away from the slug one it leaves the barrel. These offer increased accuracy. 4. Wad Slugs These are modern variations between the Foster and saboted slugs. Wad slugs are also sometimes called ‘drive key’ or ‘key’ slugs. It’s designed to fire through a smooth bore and is shaped more like a bullet with a smooth outer surface. A wad slug is loaded using a standard shotshell wad, which prevents lead fouling even when fired through a rifled barrel. Wad slugs have accuracy at a distance range of about 75 yards (70 meters), which puts them in the same category as the Foster slug. Traditional sabots can be accurate at greater distances. Wad slugs are also crimped with a fold at the end, making them easier to hand reload using a press without specialized tools. 5. Plumbata Slugs This slug has a plastic stabilizer as part of the slug. It might be either stuck into a cavity at the bottom of the projectile or over the slug in external notches. With the stabilizer in the rear of the slug, discarding sabots can be included. In the second type of Plumbata slug, the stabilizer itself acts as a sabot but remains part of the slug until impact (Impact Discarding Sabot). Shotshell Length Shotshells come in a variety of lengths. This is important to keep in mind because firing a shell longer than a shotgun’s chamber can be dangerous, even if it’s the correct gauge. Modern 12-gauge shotshells come in 2 ½-, 2 ¾-, 3-, and 3 ½-inch lengths, all holding different amounts of powder. Shotguns are marked on the barrel, for example: 12-gauge 2 ¾ inch. This shotgun’s maximum shell length is 2 ¾ inches. It’s also important to point out that you should never fire a gauge different than that of your shotgun. This can destroy a gun and lead to serious injury to both the shooter and any innocent bystanders. Always check the shell and the shotgun for compatibility. High and Low Brass A myth arises because shotgun shells have different sizes of brass. So-called ‘high brass’ shells are thought to contain more powder, making them more powerful. This may have been true at one point in the history of shotguns, but not any more. When purchasing shotgun ammo, just ignore the brass length. Conclusion If you’re new to shotgun ownership, the variety of ammunition available is probably confusing. It’s important to remember never to use shotgun shells in a different gauge as your shotgun, because this is extremely dangerous. Your choice of shotshell will depend on many factors, including what type of hunting or shooting you plan to do. Armed with your new knowledge, your next stop at the ammo store is going to be one heck of a good time! Did I forget any shotgun ammo terms? Please let me know in the comments below. Related Reads: Best Shotgun For Beginners Shotguns For Home Defense Ammo "For Home Defense" Shotgun Shell How To Reload Ammo Best 9mm Ammo Shotgun Scopes Shotgun Silencer Buy Ammo In Online Top 10 Ammo 4.6/5 (5 Reviews) Chris Browning Hey everyone I'm Chris. Founder and editor at Gun News Daily. This site was originally started by my father who passed it on to me. "Gun News Daily" has been reporting on gun news and conservative politics since 2001. We are the original gun news source. Life-long Second Amendment Supporter. 16 COMMENTS oldvet December 5, 2017 at 4:13 am I enjoyed your article tremendously. Don’t mean to pick any nits, but: 1. The ‘rifling on Brenneke & Forster-style slugs is not there to provide rotation, it is there to ensure that the slug will be stabilized in the barrel during its travel, but can safely make it out of a choked barrel. Rotational effects, if any, would be minimal at best, as these slugs rely on the weight forward (shuttlecock effect) to stabilize them in flight. 2. After pointing them out, with a pic even, you completely ignored the Buckshot loads. In some localities a required big-game hunting load. Reply Chris Coleman December 19, 2018 at 11:47 pm Actually the ribs on the sides of the Brenneke and Forster style slugs do cause them to spin after they leave the barrel and help with stability. We have shot high speed video of this to show their rotation. Reply Anthony Ricci February 5, 2018 at 8:04 pm Great piece! Reply Cass April 6, 2018 at 12:58 pm Very informative… Reply Bob Robertson April 7, 2018 at 8:01 pm So the brass base contains the firing pin? If we cannot distinguish between a firearm part and a primer, part of a shotshell, why trust any of this? Reply Sikter Efendi July 25, 2018 at 1:01 pm Starting the article with a picture of a dummy shotgun shell doesn’t help either. I stopped reading at: Sabot–a plastic shell around some shotgun shells, which give the projectile a degree of spin as it leaves the barrel. Reply GB June 4, 2018 at 12:40 pm Very clear general description of the stuff! Thank you! Reply hanne hazmonay August 30, 2018 at 9:08 pm is it true you can fire a .410 cartridge in a .45 revolver Reply Ramsey December 28, 2018 at 1:50 am All is explained very well. I am a first time shotgun owner and we spend a lot of time on bush trails. What type of shell would u suggest for a 12g for predators. I walk with two kids so something that will hurt the animal enough that it will want to bigger off as fast as it came. I usually take my 308 but can only work a bolt so fast. Reply Hans Pfadt August 16, 2019 at 6:38 pm Good article, the only thing that I would have to say on this is that the high and low brass does matter… kind of. I have a Tristar O/U and it seems that the low brass shells jam up when closing the barrel but I have no issues with the high brass shells. The high brass shells actually sit in the barrel when the extractor is all the way extended but there is a gap with the low brass shells which seems to catch the edge of the barrel when closing. Reply Jeepster October 18, 2019 at 9:49 am what would be the best load to use in a 1894 Remington side by side shot gun. Thank you Reply D. November 1, 2019 at 4:59 pm You say “A shotgun shell is cased in plastic with a brass base containing the firing pin.” ERROR = Not the firing pin (apt of the gun) but the Primer! (part of the shell). Some other things oddish but I’m not going to bother…. Reply Chris Browning November 3, 2019 at 8:14 am Updated. Thanks. Reply Todd January 31, 2020 at 2:56 am There was nothing said about these 2 terms, that I think I know now, but have not been able to confirm.: 1) Super-Magnum = 3½” length 2) Magnum = 2¾” and 3″ length, or is it just 3″ length? If just 3″ length means Magnum, does 2¾” have its own name? And P.S. Your site will not accept my Email address, which is my own company domain. I hate using Google’s Gmail or having anything at all to do with Google. Reply Chris Browning January 31, 2020 at 11:18 am Send your email to [email protected] and I will try and get your email added. Reply DN April 11, 2020 at 8:13 pm Nice piece. Thanks. I found your site while researching my Red Letter Winchester. Sure wish I could find a pic of the original pig tail lever they talk about on these. I had no idea they made Slugs for Shot guns. Would you add me to your list please? Id like to read more. Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

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